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Texas Historical Commission
Texas Historical Commission
1511 Colorado
Austin, TX 73301
thc@thc.texas.gov
(512) 463-6100
www.thc.texas.gov

Texas Revolution Historic Sites

Walk in the footsteps of Texas legends, explore the battlefield where independence was won, and immerse yourself in the events that led to the creation of a new republic. All this, and more, await when you visit the Texas Historical Commission’s Texas Revolution historic sites. From hearing the stories of those that lived in the town established by the “Father of Texas” to seeing where General Santa Anna was defeated, there’s plenty of fascinating history to uncover. Read on to learn more about these historic sites that are a must-visit for anyone captivated by the tall tales of the Lone Star State.


San Felipe de Austin State Historic Site

It can be said that San Felipe de Austin was Texas’ first capital city. Established in 1824 on the banks of the Brazos River, it was the heart of Stephen F. Austin’s Austin Colony, where he orchestrated the arrival of the first American immigrants.

This frontier hub grew to be the second largest commercial center in Texas, after San Antonio, and hit its peak in 1835 with nearly 600 people. Some of the most significant events leading up to the Texas Revolution played out here, including the conventions of 1832 and 1835. San Felipe de Austin met its end during the Runaway Scrape after the Battle of the Alamo, when the town was burned to the ground by its fleeing residents.

Although a smaller community returned to the original townsite, it would never regain its pre-war prominence.

San Felipe’s pivotal history is preserved at the San Felipe de Austin State Historic Site, located less than 50 miles west of Houston near Sealy. The old townsite’s tranquil atmosphere belies its bustling past, but there is still much to uncover. Visit a re-created log cabin that would’ve looked right at home in the 1800s version of early San Felipe de Austin and check out the interpretive panels as you explore the area. Then step inside the museum to get a close-up look at an abundance of artifacts, such as the desk used by Stephen F. Austin and coins from the era. Cast your vote for Texas independence and interact with many other hands-on exhibits that make the museum fun and accessible to all.

San Felipe de Austin State Historic Site tells many tales of Texas’ earliest days, and is a must for history enthusiasts of all ages.


Washington-on-the-Brazos State Historic Site

In the early days of March 1836, delegates from across Texas gathered at the unassuming town of Washington to make history. A time of great uncertainty, larger-than-life figures like Sam Houston and Jose Antonio Navarro put pen to paper to sign the Texas Declaration of Independence, creating a new nation. The stories of these critical moments live on at the Washington-on-the-Brazos State Historic Site. Take a step back in time as you stroll into a replica of the simple building where the delegates met, then learn all about the history of the Republic of Texas through The Star of the Republic Museum’s wide array of fascinating exhibits.

Although the historic site is open year-round, one of the best times to visit is during the Texas Independence Day Celebration. Enjoy live music, watch a historical play about the signers of the declaration, watch live demonstrations of weaving, quilting, and other 19th-century crafts, and savor fare from area food trucks. Come here on the third Saturday of each month for Living History Saturday, when volunteers dressed in period clothing relive the events that led to Texas declaring her independence.


Fannin Battleground State Historic Site

Next to the Battle of the Alamo, the Battle of Coleto Creek and the following massacre at Goliad was one of the defining moments of the Texas Revolution. On Palm Sunday, March 27, 1836, more than 400 Texian prisoners were slaughtered upon the orders of General Santa Anna. The battle and subsequent massacre are memorialized at the Fannin Battleground State Historic Site.

Learn about this pivotal moment in the war as you explore the grounds, visit the commemorative obelisk, and check out interpretive exhibits that outline the battle’s importance. Located near Goliad less than 20 miles southwest of Victoria, the battleground is an essential stop on your tour of Texas history.


San Jacinto Battleground State Historic Site

With shouts of Remember the Alamo! and Remember Goliad!, the brave men of the Texian Army launched a surprise attack on General Santa Anna’s encamped forces in a battle that would alter the course of world history. Victory came just 18 minutes later. It was here, among the marshes and groves of oak, that Texas won her freedom at the Battle of San Jacinto.

Walk the hallowed grounds for yourself at the San Jacinto Battleground State Historic Site, located less than 25 miles east of downtown Houston. Pause for a moment to admire the towering San Jacinto Monument, then tour the San Jacinto Museum of History to see uniforms and weapons from the war, as well as other exhibits that tell the story of Texas. End your visit atop the 570-foot tower, and visualize how the battle played out as you take in a bird’s-eye view of San Jacinto.

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Texas Historical Commission
Texas Historical Commission
1511 Colorado
Austin, TX 73301
(512) 463-6100
www.thc.texas.gov

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